Week @ ND Update: Arts & Performances

Theater Auditions
Loyal Daughters and Sons, a play about sexual violence and gender relations issues at Notre Dame. Scenes will be provided at auditions and no prior preparation is necessary.  Rehearsals will begin the following Sunday. Performances will take place at 7:30 p.m. from Thursday, Feb. 28 to Saturday, March 2.  LD&S is directed by Lauren Palomino. Please contact Athena Hughes  if you are interested or have any other questions. Sponsored by the Gender Studies Program.
Auditions: Tuesday and Wednesday, Jan. 29 and 30; 6 to 10 p.m. in 106 O’Shaughnessy Hall

Reading from IN & OZ by ND’s own Steve Tomasula.
IN & OZ is a novel of art, love, and auto mechanics. The story follows five different characters—an auto designer, photographer, musical composer, poet/sculptor, and mechanic—who live in two very different places: IN, a back-alley here and now; and OZ, which reflects the desire for somewhere better.
Wednesday, Jan. 30; 7:30 p.m. at the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore

History on Film: Young Mr. Lincoln (1939)  
Directed by John Ford. Not Rated, 100 minutes. $7-$4.
Introduced by Dan Graff, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of History.
Wednesday, Jan. 30; 7:30 p.m. in the Browning Cinema, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

ScreenPeace Film Festival:
Presenting five critically acclaimed films that revolve around the theme of nonviolent resistance.  Presented in partnership between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.
(All are free of charge, but ticketed (631-2800) and in the Browning Cinema, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center)

— 5 Broken Cameras (2011) 
Directed by Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi. Not Rated, 90 minutes; Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles. Winner at the Sundance Film Festival and nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary, 5 Broken Cameras is a first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil’in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements.
Introduction and post discussion led by Atalia Omer, Assistant Professor of Religion, Conflict, and Peace Studies at the Kroc Institute.
Thursday, Jan. 31; 7 p.m.

 Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (2012) 
Directed by Alison Klayman. Not Rated, 91 minutes.
The first feature-length film about the internationally-renowned Chinese artist and activist, Ai Weiwei.
Friday, Feb. 1; 6:30 p.m.

 How to Start a Revolution (2011) 
Directed by Ruaridh Arrow. Not Rated, 85 minutes.
The film reveals the remarkable story of modern revolution, the power of people to change their world and the man behind it all.  Introduction and post discussion led by David Cortright, Director of Policy Studies at the Kroc Institute.
Friday, Feb. 1; 9:30 p.m.

 The Loving Story (2012) 
Directed by Nancy Buirski. Not Rated, 77 minutes.
Nancy Buirski’s debut feature is the definitive account of Loving v. Virginia—the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.  Introduction and discussion led by Richard Pierce, Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies.
Saturday, Feb. 2; 6:30 p.m.

 Normal! (2011) 
Directed by Merzak Allouache. Not Rated, 111 minutes. French and Arabic with English subtitles.
As the Arab Spring begins in Tunisia and Egypt, filmmaker Fouzi gathers a group of actors together to show them an earlier film he made on the disillusionment of youth and seeks a new ending based on their reactions to the current political climate. Algerian master Merzak Allouache mixes documentary and fiction to craft a timely and resonant response to a nation forever changed by these historic protests.
Introduction and post discussion led by Alison Rice, Associate Professor of French.
Saturday, Feb. 2; 9:30 p.m.

Presenting Series (theater): The Actor’s Gang Presents Moliere’s Tartuffe
$40-$15. Under the artistic direction of Tim Robbins (Bull Durham, The Shawshank Redemption), The Actors’ Gang’s adaptation rivets audiences with its dark, physical comedy. A fast-paced, outrageously funny, farcical romp.
Friday, Feb. 1 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 2 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 3 at 2 p.m. in the Decio Mainstage Theatre, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Documentary: A Hymn for Alvin Ailey (1998)  
Directed by Orlando Bagwell. Not Rated, 57 minutes.
In anticipation of the DeBartolo Center’s upcoming presentation of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (March 5 and 6), we present this documentary portrait of the legendary dance company offering a rare backstage look into their fascinating creative process.
Saturday, Feb. 2; 3 p.m. in the Browning Cinema, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Organ Recital Series: Annette Richards 
“A Prussian Princess at the King of Instruments” includes music by Bach, Buxtehude and more.   $15-$5.
Sunday, Feb. 3; 2:30 and 5 p.m. in the Reyes Organ and Choral Hall, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Documentary: “Beyond the Steps: Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre” (2006)  
Directed by Phil Bertelsen. Not Rated, 53 minutes.
In anticipation of our upcoming presentation of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (March 5 and 6), we present this documentary portrait of the legendary dance company offering a rare backstage look into their fascinating creative process.
Sunday, Feb. 3; 3 p.m. in the Browning Cinema, DeBartolo Performing Arts Center

Exhibit: Paintings, Drawings, and Etchings
by Gilbert Gorski, the James A. and Louise F. Nolen Associate Professor of Architecture.
Through Friday, Feb. 8 in Bond Hall Gallery

Current exhibits at the Snite Museum of Art.

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